Friday Find: Adrian Miller on Kevin’s BBQ Joints

Monk: Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue is released later this month on April 27 on University of North Carolina Press and ahead of the book’s release he catches up with Kevin’s BBQ Joints to discuss his viewpoint on barbecue as well as his research on the book.

If you are on the fence whether you should buy a book that celebrates the black (an native American) contribution to barbecue, Miller himself puts it best: “I’m definitely not trying to say white people can’t cook barbecue; I’m saying that there’s enough room at the cookout for everybody.”

Description: In this episode I chat again with Adrian Miller, the author of forthcoming Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue.
See all things Adrian Miller here: https://adrianemiller.com
Order an autographed copy of Black Smoke here: https://adrianemiller.com/about-the-b…
Follow Adrian on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/soulfoodsch…
Check out Adrian on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/soulfoodscholar
See him on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/soulfoodscholar
Order an autographed copy of Soul Food here: https://adrianemiller.com/about-the-b…
Order an autographed copy of The President’s Kitchen here: https://adrianemiller.com/about-the-b…
See Adrian’s Colorado BBQ City Guide here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5sRH…
See my ’10 Minutes with Adrian Miller’ interview here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EO2R…

Friday Find: Kevins’ BBQ Joints Interviews Elliott Moss

Monk: Kevin spoke with Elliott Moss recently in a wide-ranging conversation starting with his earliest memories of barbecue to how he got into cooking first at a Chic-Fil-A then The Admiral in Asheville, where he was awarded a James Beard Nomination, to the thought process behind Buxton Hall. Elliott also goes into detail about the dishes on his menu that make the restaurant in his mind: whole hog barbecue, barbecue hash, and chicken bog. I’ve read a lot on Moss both in his cookbook as well as various profiles online but this was perhaps the first time I’ve heard his voice in an audio interview.

Moss seems to be in a good place mentally and emotionally despite the pandemic, and it can seemingly be attributed to his decision to quit drinking last July. Between then and roller blading, his mind is as clear as its been in quite some time. Which is great for him.

Description: In this episode I chat with Chef Elliott Moss from Buxton Hall Barbecue in Asheville, North Carolina.

See all things Buxton Hall Barbecue here: http://www.buxtonhall.com
Visit Buxton Hall Barbecue here: 32 Banks, Ave., Asheville, NC. 28801
Give Buxton Hall Barbecue a call here: 828-232-7216
Current hours: 11:30am – 8:30pm – Tuesday – Sunday
Place an order online here: Order: https://www.toasttab.com/buxton-hall-…
Or you can order at the restaurant.
Order delivery via Kickback here: https://www.kickbackavl.com/r/141/res…
Follow them on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/buxtonhallbbq
Email Elliott here: elliottmoss@gmail.com
Order gift cards here: https://www.toasttab.com/buxton-hall-…
Place a catering order here: http://www.buxtonhall.com/catering
See all things Little Louies here: http://www.buxtonhall.com/littlelouies
Hours: Open Friday and Saturday: 11:30am – 9pm – Sunday’s and Monday’s 12pm – 6pm
Follow Little Louies on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/littlelouie…
See Elliott’s adventures here: https://www.instagram.com/elliottmoss

Friday Find: Barbecue’s Forgotten American History

Monk: Last month, as part of Black History Month Adrian Miller sat down with Flatland, the digital platform for Kansas City PBS, to discuss barbecue’s hidden history not only with black people but also the Native Americans before that. Being a Kansas City-based outlet, the focus is on barbecue of that area, including pioneer Henry Perry as well as Arthur Bryant and Ollie Gates but comes with a warning against the signs of potential erasure of black contributions to barbecue much like has been done with Native Americans and their early contributions to barbecue. A great primer for Miller’s forthcoming book Black Smoke, out next month.

Description:
Adrian Miller is on a mission. He wants to ensure the whole story of barbecue is told.

Miller recently sat down with Flatland to discuss a few key findings from his book: “Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue.”

Miller contends the barbecue story, in large part, is one of cultural appropriation. He notes, for example, that Native Americans were the first to barbecue. Enslaved Black people then became pre-eminent. Only later did white people come to dominate the barbecue narrative.

Friday Find: Bob Garner Visits Wilber’s Barbecue on NC Weekend

After Wilber’s closed in March 2019 due to unpaid back taxes, a local ownership group led by Willis Underwood III and his son Willis IV stepped forward and reopened the restaurant in the summer of 2020, not 15 months after the closing. Bob Garner checked out the restaurant that is once again smoking whole hogs over coals but has added a few new menu items including a rib box of ribs pulled from the hog and served with vinegar. And Bob declares they are back.

Description: Bob Garner visits the iconic Wilber’s Barbecue in Goldsboro which has re-opened to the delight of the community.