Friday Find: Ed and Ryan Mitchell on the NC F&B Podcast

Link to podcast

Monk: Ed Mitchell and his son and business partner Ryan joined last week’s episode of The NC Food and Beverage Podcast with Max Trujillo and Matthew Weiss to discuss how Ed got into barbecue, the state of Raleigh barbecue, and The Preserve, their upcoming venture with Lou and Amber Moshakos in the original location of Carolina Ale House. Lou was the restaurateur behind Carolina Ale House and several other brands and Amber is the current president of LM Restaurants.

While we do get some information, I do wish that Ryan hadn’t dominated the conversation so much. There were long stretches of several minutes where it was only Ryan talking, and I think we can all agree that Ed is who everyone wants to hear from. Regardless, let’s hope The Preserve is more successful than their last restaurant, Ed Mitchell’s ‘Que, which closed in 2015 (for the record, we quite liked) and their announced but never opened restaurant in Brier Creek that was to be called Ed Mitchell’s Q.

Link to podcast

Linkdown: 1/22/20

Not all heroes wear capes

The Charlotte edition of the Beer, Bourbon, and BBQ Festival is moving from Symphony Park to Bank of America Stadium

Noble Smoke and Sweet Lew’s BBQ make Charlotte food blog Scallion Pancake’s list of best Charlotte restaurants

5 barbecue questions for Dave Grohl features this gem:

Grohl: I’m an East Coast guy. I grew up in Virginia, so my favorite barbecue is North Carolina barbecue. It is whole-hog pork, salted, over hickory wood and when it comes off you pull it, chop it and put a North Carolina vinegar sauce on it which is vinegar, black pepper and hot sauce and that’s it, really. You put that on a white bun with coleslaw and that’s my favorite.

Khói Barbecue has a unique take on Texas barbecue

John Tanner’s BBQ Blog muses on barbecue and the fine art

Longtime Houston pitmaster Angelica Martinez is featured by J.C. Reid in this Instagram post

Memphis in May 2020 is now less than 100 days away

GULP

Barbecue Bros Film Club: The Chef Show S1E8 – "Hot Luck" (Netflix)

Watch Now (Netflix subscription required)

Monk: In the first of two episodes with Aaron Franklin, “The Chef Show” guys learned the basics of trimming, rubbing, and serving a brisket. Now, Favreau and Choi stick around to serve a variation of Choi’s famous short ribs at Franklin’s Hot Luck festival.

But before that, they are chatting over a ridiculous looking platter of meat at Franklin Barbecue and discussing the the “left vs right” theory of brisket. In short, the majority of cows are “rightys” (like humans) and get up from a lying position on their right side. So the theory goes, pitmasters always will want a left brisket from their distributors and thus they are harder to find. Franklin, however, doesn’t lend any credence to this theory and calls BS, even though he notes that he just so happens to have a lot of left briskets at his restaurant. Favreau jokes that he and the rest of the regular joes out there must get all the right briskets for their backyard then. They also discuss stick burners and Franklin’s approach to temperate versus feel. As with any of these conversations, its fascinating to get insight into Franklin’s mind.

Then, the conversation shifts to the Hot Luck Festival, which Aaron created to be the “anti-food-festival festival” for chefs and cooks. This was filmed ahead of the very first one in 2017, and Franklin explains his approach in inviting friends and cooks that he admires. Essentially, he wants each chef to cook what they would cook for their friends, “even if that’s just hot dogs.” Roy Choi is cooking his famous Kalbi short ribs with the tweak that he will be starting them off in the smoker, which isn’t normally the case for Korean short ribs (but which Franklin is very into). Then, Favreau joins Choi in the kitchen to begin prep.

Choi begins game planning what prep can be done today (sauce, kimchi) versus what would need to be done tomorrow (smoking and grilling of the ribs). With just one Vitamix blender (as opposed to a big immersion blender that could be submerged into the big pot), the process isn’t as efficient as it could be but you can see where Choi is adjusting the scaled-up recipe based on instinct and tasting along the way. I wonder if Favreau knew exactly what he signed up when he volunteered to assist Roy in the kitchen.

Texas Monthly Barbecue Editor Daniel Vaughn makes a brief cameo as Favreau and Choi are heading to the smokehouse to check out their smoker for the following day. He will make another appearance later in the episode.

The final piece of prep for the day is marinating the beef short ribs in the Kalbi sauce they just made; Favreau looks exhausted by the end of it.

After a quick diversion to a deconstructed s’more from Rebecca Masson of Fluff Bake Bar (and the custom-made flame apparatus create by Franklin for the festival), it’s finally the day of the festival and time to get down to business. Favreau is once again put to work loading the smoker with the short ribs and 5 hours later, they are done with the initial smoke part of the process. Choi serves a sample rib to fellow Angeleno Adam Perry Lang of APL, who is in town for the festival and approves.

Choi shows Favreau how to finish the ribs on the grill and then heads out to the festival to begin serving. Favreau sends platters of finished ribs out to Choi who slices them and puts them in a bowl with rice and the kimchi they prepared yesterday.

Hot Luck looks awesome, and you get a little sense of the other dishes and chefs/cooks there, including the aforementioned Daniel Vaughn’s smoked NY strip taco.

This episode was a little more process-oriented than the previous episode, mainly because of Choi’s participation in Hot Luck. I’ve gotta say, it was funny to see Favreau working so hard though I must sympathize because that looked to be extremely hot conditions at the festival considering it was May in Austin.

While these two episodes are my only exposure to “The Chef Show” to date, I may go back and check out the other, non-barbecue episodes. Favreau and Choi have an easy going camaraderie between them and the episodes are a good length at 30 minutes or less each. Season 1 was broken into two “volumes” that both premiered in 2019 so I will be curious to see how much more of this show (if any) there will be since Favreau is now helming “The Mandolorian” on Disney+ and Choi is surely busy with his own ventures. In any case, these two episodes are a welcome insight into the mind of Aaron Franklin that you wouldn’t be able to get by watching old episodes of “BBQ Pitmasters.”

Watch Now (Netflix subscription required)

Friday Find: "Too Much Pork for Just One Fork" by Southern Culture on the Skids

Southern Culture on the Skids (or “SCOTS” for short) are a band from Chapel Hill, NC who while I was in high school were best known (to me at least) for their live shows where at various points they would pass around a large aluminum pan of banana pudding (during their song “Banana Puddin'”, naturally) and buckets of fried chicken. This song appears on their 1994 album Ditch Diggin’ as well as the 2013 re-recording of the album called Dig This.

Lyrics:
I got too much pork for just one fork
Won’t you pass that apple pie
I got a-too much pork for just one fork
Oh won’t you pass that apple pie

I said hey mister rhythm, mister rhythm is king
He killed the pig with a tambourine
Everybody got happy, everybody got glad
Till the weather turned warm
And that pig went bad

I got too much pork for just one fork
Won’tcha pass that apple pie
I got too much pork for just one fork
Won’tcha pass that apple pie

Now don’t you worry
Everybody here’s gonna get paid
Ah don’t you worry
That’s what the boss man say
I gotta too much pork for just one fork
Too much pork

I said, hey mister rhythm, mister rhythm is king
He killed the pig with a tambourine
Everybody got happy, everybody got glad
Till the weather turned warm
And that pig went bad

I got too much pork for just one fork
Won’tcha pass that apple pie?
I got too much pork for just one fork
Won’tcha pass that apple pie
Hey don’t you worry
Everybody here’s gonna get paid
Yeah don’t you worry
Everybody here’s gonna get laid
I got too much pork for just one fork
Too much ham for just one jam
I got too much sow for just one bow
Hey babe I’m talkin’ pig oh honey can you dig
I got too much, too much, too much, too much
Too much pork
I got too much, too much, too much, too much
Too much pork