Linkdown: 8/12/20

RIP to a Texas legend, Prause’s Market

Bobbee O’s BBQ is “the best barbecue in North Charlotte, and some of the best barbecue in the area period” according to Unpretentious Palate, which I happen to disagree with quite a bit (paywall)

Pretty cool: Buxton Hall Barbecue in Lego form

Charleston Wine + Food has been cancelled for 2021

A “Ken” was spotted at Bonfire BBQ in Asheville; the man was a Grubhub driver who refused to put on a mask when picking up food and has since been terminated from the food delivery service

Ms. Helen, as presented by Robert Jacob Lerma

This guy gets it

Don’t sleep! Now just 4 more weekends in the NC Pork Council’s #SummerofCue

Barbecue Bros Book Club: “Tar Heel Traveler Eats” by Scott Mason

Not that we’re anywhere close to being qualified enough to evaluate books but more so as a public service announcement we will periodically discuss barbecue and barbecue-related books.

Monk: “Tar Heel Traveler Eats” by Scott Mason is equal parts travelogue, memoir, and in-depth description of the journalistic process for a local feature newscaster. Mason has been doing “Tar Heel Traveler” segments for WRAL in Raleigh since the early 2000’s after working his way up through local news stations around the country. Mason has a folksy tone to his writing that is easy to read and the book goes by pretty quickly. While Mason’s writing is easy to read, all photos in the book are stills from the WRAL telecasts of his “Tar Heel Traveler” segment. I certainly get the practical reasons why, but it seems like such a missed opportunity given the number and breadth of the places he visited.

Subtitled “Food Journeys Across North Carolina,” his journey starts with profiles of hot dog restaurants before moving on to hamburgers then barbecue and finally ending with sweets and desserts. Along the way, he visits many of the iconic North Carolina institutions that should be on everyone’s list – barbecue or otherwise. But of course, what I was most interested in were the chapters on barbecue.

After a chapter where he acknowledges how much of a no-win situation writing about barbecue is in North Carolina (what with the east vs west/Lexington rivalry), Mason nevertheless delved into barbecue restaurants after getting his fill of the hot dog and hamburger joints. Despite being born in North Carolina he is apparently not a huge fan of barbecue and would almost always prefer a juicy cheeseburger or two mustard dogs over it. I’ll just assume that’s because he moved to Massachusetts shortly after he was born.

In any case, the barbecue restaurants he writes about his visits to are Bill’s Barbecue (Wilson), Parker’s (Wilson), B’s Barbecue (Greenville), Pik N Pig (Carthage), Wilber’s Barbecue (Goldsboro), and Clyde Cooper’s (Raleigh). Certainly not a comprehensive list, and more a list of easy-to-drive-to places from Raleigh. Each chapter deals with the circumstances that led him to that town or restaurant from his newscaster perspective and how he obtained the footage for the feature story, whether it was interviewing the owner of the restaurant or by going table to table to get sound bites from willing customers. Mason usually has an interesting anecdote or two before reflecting on his experience at the restaurant and closing out the chapter. It’s certainly a different reading experience from other books that might offer more of a profile of each barbecue restaurant, but not an unwelcome one.

If you’re interested in not only North Carolina barbecue restaurants, but classic southern ones, read “Tarheel Traveler Eats” and keep a pen and paper handy so you can jot down all the places you should visit across the state.

Available at Amazon or wherever you buy books

Friday Find: “Here’s Why Wood is the Unsung Hero of Texas Barbecue”

Monk: Zagat travels from New York to Lockhart, Texas to understand why post oak is so instrumental to that style of barbecue. Post oak – so named because it grows straight enough to make fence posts – is native to central Texas and in this video is referred to as “wholesomely sweet” and the “terroir of Texas barbecue.” The host even spends time with the hardworking laborers who have cut down and split it for Kreuz Market since 1975 before treating them to a meal there (a nice touch).

(h/t The Smoke Sheet)

Description:
Texas’ Hill Country is known as the center of American barbecue culture thanks to an abundance of amazing local ingredients. And while most people recognize cattle as the secret to the state’s legendary cuisine, it’s Texas Post Oak that helps put everything in motion. The wood is so popular that restaurants like New York City’s Hill Country Barbecue Market won’t use anything else, even if it means having it shipped over 1,700 miles every week. Zagat traveled to Texas’ famed Kreuz Market in Lockhart to discover what makes this regional wood a favorite amongst pitmasters – and why making that beloved brisket is a lot more dangerous than we think.

Linkdown: 8/5/20

So glad to see Grant writing barbecue chapters for Marie, Let’s Eat!

Gerri Grady’s of Grady’s speaks with NC Tripping

The 2020 World Series of Barbecue is cancelled

Heritage Barbecue in San Juan Capistrano will open this Saturday, according to Kevin’s BBQ Joints

Bill Addison’s list of 11 places to get barbecue in Los Angeles

Here’s hoping more than just chain restaurants survive this pandemic

Sam’s BBQ had been in the news recently after country band Midland appropriated an image of their storefront while photoshopping out their name

Meal kits from Pappy’s Smokehouse, Mighty Quinn’s BBQ, and Joes Kansas City BBQ from Goldbelly are on Buzzfeed’s list of 21 worth ordering

The Pig Island NYC BBQ will be held on Staten Island this September

ICYMI