Linkdown: 5/20/20

Heim Barbecue laments rising meat prices in this piece from the local Fort Worth paper: “I’m afraid these meat shortages are going to be the final nail in the coffin for a lot of independent BBQ joints” 

In NC, JD’s Smokehouse in Connelly Springs has been having issues procuring meat

Rodney Scott’s newest barbecue store won’t open in Atlanta by the end of the spring as originally planned, but they are still moving forward

For those barbecue fans looking for a new ebook

Pork prices have increased by 3%

Five spots for “quarantine barbecue” in Asheville, according to the AVL Today blog

NYC barbecue takeout options

Quite the photo here

Even the NC Museum of History is getting in on “The Last Dance” memes

Linkdown: 4/15/20

Grady’s BBQ has closed until further notice

The Southern Smoke Foundation has donated more than $600,000 during the coronavirus pandemic

Barbecue joints from Los Angeles to Portland to Texas are having to adapt to a new model of doing business

Support Texas BBQ

Jon G’s Barbecue has an updated website ahead of their brick and mortar launch later this year

Wilber’s Barbecue continuing to get us primed

Tommy Tomlinson gets it

Bette Midler gets it

Linkdown: 3/18/20

The Campaign for Real Barbecue, (aka True Cue) expands to Virginia and DC, with John Tanner of John Tanner’s Barbecue Blog leading the charge. Founded in 2014, the Campaign already operates in North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, and Georgia.

Franklin Barbecue lines haven’t been stopped by coronavirus, at least not yet

Heim Barbecue has a new shirt available with 100% of the proceeds going to its employees who are affected by the coronavirus

Southern Soul BBQ is feeding hospitality and service industry employees associated

Cook’s Barbecue in Lexington has reopened after its husband and wife owners were involved in a car wreck earlier this month; Jason Heitman, the husband, is still in a hospital

Catching up with Chef Ashley Capps, formerly the of pastry chef at Buxton Hall

Predictably, the Houston Barbecue Festival has been canceled

Port City BBQ will be offering eastern NC barbecue to Wilmington and Wrightsville Beach this summer, though they will be smoking in an Ole Hickory

Robert Moss on the history of hash and rice

A belated happy birthday to Carey Bringle, the Peg Leg Porker himself

Barbecue Bros Film Club: The Chef Show S1E8 – “Hot Luck” (Netflix)

Watch Now (Netflix subscription required)

Monk: In the first of two episodes with Aaron Franklin, “The Chef Show” guys learned the basics of trimming, rubbing, and serving a brisket. Now, Favreau and Choi stick around to serve a variation of Choi’s famous short ribs at Franklin’s Hot Luck festival.

But before that, they are chatting over a ridiculous looking platter of meat at Franklin Barbecue and discussing the the “left vs right” theory of brisket. In short, the majority of cows are “rightys” (like humans) and get up from a lying position on their right side. So the theory goes, pitmasters always will want a left brisket from their distributors and thus they are harder to find. Franklin, however, doesn’t lend any credence to this theory and calls BS, even though he notes that he just so happens to have a lot of left briskets at his restaurant. Favreau jokes that he and the rest of the regular joes out there must get all the right briskets for their backyard then. They also discuss stick burners and Franklin’s approach to temperate versus feel. As with any of these conversations, its fascinating to get insight into Franklin’s mind.

Then, the conversation shifts to the Hot Luck Festival, which Aaron created to be the “anti-food-festival festival” for chefs and cooks. This was filmed ahead of the very first one in 2017, and Franklin explains his approach in inviting friends and cooks that he admires. Essentially, he wants each chef to cook what they would cook for their friends, “even if that’s just hot dogs.” Roy Choi is cooking his famous Kalbi short ribs with the tweak that he will be starting them off in the smoker, which isn’t normally the case for Korean short ribs (but which Franklin is very into). Then, Favreau joins Choi in the kitchen to begin prep.

Choi begins game planning what prep can be done today (sauce, kimchi) versus what would need to be done tomorrow (smoking and grilling of the ribs). With just one Vitamix blender (as opposed to a big immersion blender that could be submerged into the big pot), the process isn’t as efficient as it could be but you can see where Choi is adjusting the scaled-up recipe based on instinct and tasting along the way. I wonder if Favreau knew exactly what he signed up when he volunteered to assist Roy in the kitchen.

Texas Monthly Barbecue Editor Daniel Vaughn makes a brief cameo as Favreau and Choi are heading to the smokehouse to check out their smoker for the following day. He will make another appearance later in the episode.

The final piece of prep for the day is marinating the beef short ribs in the Kalbi sauce they just made; Favreau looks exhausted by the end of it.

After a quick diversion to a deconstructed s’more from Rebecca Masson of Fluff Bake Bar (and the custom-made flame apparatus create by Franklin for the festival), it’s finally the day of the festival and time to get down to business. Favreau is once again put to work loading the smoker with the short ribs and 5 hours later, they are done with the initial smoke part of the process. Choi serves a sample rib to fellow Angeleno Adam Perry Lang of APL, who is in town for the festival and approves.

Choi shows Favreau how to finish the ribs on the grill and then heads out to the festival to begin serving. Favreau sends platters of finished ribs out to Choi who slices them and puts them in a bowl with rice and the kimchi they prepared yesterday.

Hot Luck looks awesome, and you get a little sense of the other dishes and chefs/cooks there, including the aforementioned Daniel Vaughn’s smoked NY strip taco.

This episode was a little more process-oriented than the previous episode, mainly because of Choi’s participation in Hot Luck. I’ve gotta say, it was funny to see Favreau working so hard though I must sympathize because that looked to be extremely hot conditions at the festival considering it was May in Austin.

While these two episodes are my only exposure to “The Chef Show” to date, I may go back and check out the other, non-barbecue episodes. Favreau and Choi have an easy going camaraderie between them and the episodes are a good length at 30 minutes or less each. Season 1 was broken into two “volumes” that both premiered in 2019 so I will be curious to see how much more of this show (if any) there will be since Favreau is now helming “The Mandolorian” on Disney+ and Choi is surely busy with his own ventures. In any case, these two episodes are a welcome insight into the mind of Aaron Franklin that you wouldn’t be able to get by watching old episodes of “BBQ Pitmasters.”

Watch Now (Netflix subscription required)