Friday Find: Christopher Prieto of Prime BBQ on Kevin’s BBQ Joints

Monk: Christopher Prieto was interviewed by Kevin’s BBQ Joints in a podcast that was posted last November, a few months into the restaurant opening during a pandemic. The restaurant opening is the focus of the interview, and they decide to save Christopher’s origins story for a future podcast. Kevin doesn’t have to prompt him too much, as Christopher certainly has his long-winded spiel down pat, much like I experienced in my preview of the restaurant nearly a year ago. Bonus for viewers on YouTube as opposed to the podcast: Christopher gives a tour of his restaurant, which he is clearly proud of (and for good reason).

Description:
In this episode I chat with Chris Prieto from PRIME Barbecue in Knightdale, North Carolina.

See all things PRIME Barbecue here: https://prime-bbq.com
Pre-Order here: https://prime-bbq.com/pre-order/
See PRIME Barbecue on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/primebbq
Check them out on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/primebbq
Follow them on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/PrimeBBQ
See Chris on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/barbecue_nerd/

PRIME Barbecue
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday. – 11AM – Sold Out
Located at: 403 Knightdale Station Run, Knightdale, NC 27545

Be sure to check out the complete restaurant tour at the end of the video.

This chat was so great. It was actually supposed to happen over a year ago, but it seems like it was fate to happen now because we got a chance to explore what it was like to open a dream restaurant(one he bad been planning for 2 years) during the pandemic. He opened Cinco de Mayo and goes into depth the build up to realizing that his opening would be completely different than he imagined and all the hurdles and fluctuations they had to go through to turn a sit-down business into a completely to-go one.

For his restaurant he obsessed over every single detail and goes into great depth about this in our chat. He also talks about his relationship with his mom and dad and how upsetting it was to not have them there for the opening.

He goes into insane detail about everything they are offering and the logic that goes into why they are on the menu. It sounds incredible. Especially options like Creekstone Brisket, scratch-made sausage, lechon and red beans and rice.

This restaurant is 100% of what he dreamt about and he has been preparing himself for his entire life for this.

Linkdown: 2/17/21

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Product Review: Matt’s Rub from Midwood Smokehouse

Monk: After interviewing pitmasters Matthew Berry and Michael Wagner from Midwood Smokehouse, I took home a bottle of the (at the time) recently-released Matt’s Rub. Nearly two years later and I have certainly put it through its paces on a variety of meats.

Most recently I used the rub for pork belly burnt ends I smoked for this year’s Super Bowl following this recipe from Hardcore Carnivore. After cubing the 9 lb. pork belly, I tossed them in the rub to evenly coat before placing on a cooking rack and placing in the smoker for two hours.

After two hours (rotating the racks in the smoker after an hour), I tossed them in a sauce mixture of Sweet Baby Ray’s, local honey, and chicken broth before putting back onto the smoker in an aluminum pan for another 2 hours total.

In total, after 4 hours I had pork pillows perfect for Super Bowl snacking. I have extolled the virtues of pork belly burnt ends before and I wasn’t let down by smoking them for the big game, both in terms of results as well as time spent. Each bite was well-balanced between spice, smoke, and sweetness.

And what about Matt’s Rub? The rub itself has a slight kick but I have found it to be a great all purpose rub. From this pork belly to pork butts, pork tenderloins, chuck roasts, chicken, and burgers, each time I was quite pleased with the results.From that conversation almost 2 years ago, here’s what Mathew and Mike each used it on, at least back then:

Is it an all-purpose rub? It can go on anything? What do you use it most on at home?
MB: At home? I use it on burgers the most. I cook a lot of burgers at home.
MW: I would use it on beef and pork. I would use it on chicken with maybe a little more black pepper, just cause that’s the way I like it. I mean anybody that knows anything about dry rubs, if they make one its going to have all of this in it.

Midwood Smokehouse has also since introduced a line of sauces, which we briefly discussed in that same conversation. Maybe next time maybe I’ll use their Matt’s Original Sauce instead of the mass-produced Sweet Baby Ray’s.

You can purchase Matt’s Rub online and at all Midwood Smokehouse locations.

Friday Find: How Pitmaster John Lewis Brought Texas Barbecue to South Carolina

John Lewis gives some insight into his process for his brand that he’s brought to the lowcountry of South Carolina. From his famous hot guts smoked in a vertical smoker to his pastrami brisket, ribeyes, and oxtails smoked in his custom offset. He then uses those meats in inventive sandwiches like their version of an Arby’s beef and cheddar or a pastrami brisket reuben as well as his smoked prime rib special and a Tex-mex inspired oxtail dish. Lewis even gets into his love of hatch green chiles and how they are incorporated into a lot of his dishes as well as how makes his own tortillas because there are not tortillerias in SC that meet his standards. Recently, Lewis announced that his Juan Luis concept is taking over the entire food hall space formerly occupied by Workshop.

For more Smoke Point, click here.

Description: Pitmaster John Lewis is known not only for his mouthwatering South Carolina brisket, sausages, and ribs, but also for his dedication to “perfecting” the art of barbecue by customizing his own smokers. He’s also known for getting creative with brining, rubbing, and smoking techniques.