Linkdown: 8/9/17

– Seems like a good time was had by all at Pig & Pedals in Asheboro this past weekend

– Making a mental note to try berliner weisse next time I eat barbecue

– A BBQ&A with Mighty Quinn’s pitmaster Hugh Mangum

– At Lexington Barbecue, if you can’t take the heat get yo’ booty out the pit room

Linkdown: 3/23/16

– North Carolina, y’all:

– Midwood Smokehouse is opening its 3rd Charlotte-area location at the Park Road Shopping Center later this year

– A new barbecue and music venue called Raleigh Roadhouse sets its grand opening April 1-2 in Raleigh on Glenwood Avenue

– John Shelton Reed’s upcoming Barbecue book is included in this rundown of upcoming books

– Grant visits Archer’s BBQ in Knoxville, a small regional chain

– Daniel Vaughn visits The Beast, a Texas-style joint in Paris, and is pleasantly surprised

– The Central Carolina BBQ Academy has begun meeting in Dunn at the old Harnett High School (for now)

In a small, smoky room of a long-closed school, Gregory Hamm is teaching heresy. His disciples, long familiar with the eastern Carolina dogma of barbecue, are being taught that there’s more to perfect pork than vinegar.

– Hugh Mangum of Mighty Quinn’s has Houston roots

– Southern chefs (and a couple barbecue men) ponder whats next for southern food

Linkdown: 9/3/14

– This posted just after last week’s linkdown so is a little old by now, but The New York Times spends 36 hours in Charlotte and gives props to Midwood Smokehouse

8. ‘Cue & Brew | 7 p.m.

Charlotte has never been known as a big barbecue town, but Midwood Smokehouse’s pitmaster and executive chef, Matt Barry, seeks to change that with this noisy, popular restaurant. Mr. Barry cooks his chicken, pork and turkey over North Carolina hickory in a computer-controlled smoker. His hand-pulled, chopped pork is lightly covered with a vinegar-based sauce. The chicken is tossed with a delicious house or mustard sauce. Texas-style brisket is smoked for 12 to 14 hours, and is delicious dry or slathered in sauce (barbecue plates run $8 to $15). Pair with collards and baked beans and chase with a Red Ale from NoDa Brewing Company ($5).

– Speaking of Midwood, they are bringing barbecue into the 21st century with its new online ordering app

– The folks behind the Great NC BBQ Map have 5 tips for planning a barbecue tour

– Marie, Let’s Eat! visits Wiley’s Championship BBQ in Savannah, GA

– This showed up in our timeline recently even though the original article is from July 2012, but in any case here’s Rodney Scott’s BBQ Mixtape featuring a mix of rap, hip hop, and funk

– Here’s how to make the Korean-Southern ribs a la Heirloom Market BBQ

– Eater Austin spends a day with John Lewis of la Barbecue (via)

Short interview on barbecue and grilling tips with Hugh Mangum of Mighty Quinn’s BBQ (via)

– The NC Barbecue Trail is in good company on this list of other trails worth visiting which include cheese, bourbon, and beer

– The NC BBQ Association is looking for judges for the Q City Charlotte Championship in October:

– Slaw is the most distinctive food in North Carolina, according to this infographic:

What you’re looking at isn’t the most popular food by state. It’s the food that most distinguishes them from the rest of the pack.

From Co.Design