Friday Find: Armenian-influenced Texas barbecue on "No Passport Required"

Link to Episode (Skip ahead to 32:29 to 38:00; expires 3/15/20)

Chef-turned-pitmaster Arthur Grigoryan fell in love with Texas barbecue after a visit to Franklin Barbecue with his girlfriend some years ago. Since then, he has been on a mission with III Mas BBQ (pronounced “3 Mas” and named after the working-class district where Grigoryan’s dad grew up and worked in the meat business in Yerevan, Armenia) to fuse flavors from his native Armenia in a series of monthly pop-ups in his parent’s backyard in Sherman Oaks, CA.

That means barbecue sauces made with pomegranate molasses and rubs for brisket and beef ribs that include Aleppo pepper, fenugreek, and paprika. Grigoryan even smokes the meat in his offset Yoder Smoker over different kinds f woods which include red oak and almond wood.

For more information: iiimasbbq.com

Full Episode Description: Host Marcus Samuelsson arrives in sunny Los Angeles to meet with Armenians influencing the city’s food scene. Armenian food is diaspora food — the community is widespread, building homes in countries like Turkey and Syria following the Armenian Genocide.

Link to Episode (Skip ahead to 32:29 to 38:00; expires 3/15/20)

Friday Find: LA Shut This BBQ Place Down But It’s Still Cooking

Moo’s Craft Barbecue is one of a handful of places giving Los Angeles legitimate barbecue. Here’s their story from Food Insider.

Description: Moo’s Craft Barbecue was shut down because the owners were smoking meats in their home, but their fans have encouraged them to continue cooking their famous barbecue. Now, they work in a commercial pop-up kitchen churning out brisket, pork ribs, and beef ribs all over LA. To find out when Moo’s next pop-up is, visit: http://www.instagram.com/mooscraftbarbecue/

Linkdown: 3/6/19

Congrats to Bryan Furman of B’s Cracklin’ Barbeque for his James Beard Award semifinal nomination!

Veteran Charlotte restaurateur Pierre Bader closes City Smoke, cites that he doesn’t “see any growth in the barbecue business in Charlotte.” I would argue that he might have seen growth had his restaurant’s barbecue been better (they were 40 out of 42 on our list before their close)

Local Charlotte barbecue guy Jack Arnold recently had his Instagram hacked but thankfully has since recovered it

A new barbecue cookbook is coming from photographer Ken Goodman:

Wilson gets a new barbecue restaurant in New South BBQ, which takes an “international house of barbecue” approach

Longleaf Swine (nice name), a food truck caterer in Raleigh, is going brick and mortar in the Transfer Co. Food Hall

The Free Times in Columbia breaks down barbecue restaurants both local and within a few hours drive

Food and Wine is loving Columbia, SC and thinks you should try to the hash: “Don’t fill up on grits, because you must also try the barbecue, which will be pork, served along with that could-stop-traffic yellow sauce, and a side of that curiously delicious regional specialty, hash, which is nearly always served over rice. Essentially a stew of all the animal parts you probably wouldn’t eat separately, hash might come off a tad musky for some, but this is nose-to-tail cooking at its finest.”

I wonder how the folks in Texas are reacting to this:

For Kathleen Purvis’s last story as Charlotte Observer food writer, she takes a look at the fried pork skins at Sweet Lew’s BBQ as well as the fried chicken skin from Yolk. I love her writing and look forward to seeing what she does next.