Friday Find: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Ed Mitchell

The Gravy podcast from the Southern Foodway Alliance interviews Ed Mitchell and his son Ryan on the past and the future of their barbecue ventures and how it hasn’t been so easy for a black man to innovate barbecue in eastern NC.

Description: Ed Mitchell’s name has come to be synonymous with Eastern North Carolina wood-smoked whole-hog barbecue. From Wilson, North Carolina, he grew up smoking hogs and has tried to continue that tradition, using old techniques and traditionally farm-raised pigs. 

But almost since the start, Ed Mitchell’s barbeque journey has not been a straight line—business relationships, racism, and smoke have all shaped his rollercoaster ride.

Reporter Wilson Sayre is our guide in looking at those twists and turns.

Linkdown: 2/26/20

The Fusion BBQ Beer Fest claimed to be hosting an event at Dodger Stadium in June, only no one has heard of the organizers and there is a Dodger game that day

You say that South Carolina has 4 distinct barbecue regions? Not so fast my friend, says Robert Moss

More whole hog in Texas from Bryan Bingham of Bodacious BBQ in Longview, Russell Roegels with Roegels Barbecue in Houston, and Tyler Harp from Harp Barbecue in Kansas City

The 3rd annual BBQ Summit at the Lenoir County Cooperative Extension brought cook teams and judges from all over the state to Kinston last Saturday

Congrats to Vera’s Backyard Bar-B-Que of Brownsville, TX on being named an American Classic by the James Beard Foundation

Mighty Quinn’s BBQ will give sad Knicks fans good food options at the Garden

ICYMI, I wrote about barbecue on streaming TV for The Smoke Sheet in last week’s issue; read below

Linkdown: 1/29/20

RIP to another classic NC barbecue joint: Hill’s Lexington Barbecue in Winston-Salem has closed after 68(!!) years

Prime BBQ will finally open this March in Knightdale

A decent list from Big 7 Travel of the 25 best barbecue places in NC, but there are also some head scratchers

Texans are starting to go whole hog for…well, you know

Barbecue historian Robert Moss digs deep to find out where the idea of “pulled pork” came from when most pork barbecue (aka “barbecue”) is chopped in the Carolinas

RIP Woody Phillips of Woody’s Bar-B-Que in LA

Condé Nast Traveler with their list of favorite Austin barbecue joints

Always worth revisiting this gem from Our State Magazine

A few of Charleston’s less-heralded barbecue joints have closed: Smoke BBQ and Black Wood Smokehouse

Smoking wings for the big game? Jess Pryles has you covered

Linkdown: 1/22/20

Not all heroes wear capes

The Charlotte edition of the Beer, Bourbon, and BBQ Festival is moving from Symphony Park to Bank of America Stadium

Noble Smoke and Sweet Lew’s BBQ make Charlotte food blog Scallion Pancake’s list of best Charlotte restaurants

5 barbecue questions for Dave Grohl features this gem:

Grohl: I’m an East Coast guy. I grew up in Virginia, so my favorite barbecue is North Carolina barbecue. It is whole-hog pork, salted, over hickory wood and when it comes off you pull it, chop it and put a North Carolina vinegar sauce on it which is vinegar, black pepper and hot sauce and that’s it, really. You put that on a white bun with coleslaw and that’s my favorite.

Khói Barbecue has a unique take on Texas barbecue

John Tanner’s BBQ Blog muses on barbecue and the fine art

Longtime Houston pitmaster Angelica Martinez is featured by J.C. Reid in this Instagram post

Memphis in May 2020 is now less than 100 days away

GULP