Linkdown: 3/23/22

Featured

The Southern Foodways Alliance presents a barbecue sides bracket for their contribution to this year’s March Madness. Vote now as we’re already in the Final Four, with the Championship tomorrow and the winner announced Friday.

Native News

If true, not a good look for Noble Smoke

D.G. Martin seeks input from readers on NC eateries off interstate highways for the next edition of “North Carolina Roadside Eateries”

BBQ Fest on the Neuse wants to know: are you team slaw or not?

Non-Native News

Archibald’s BBQ is celebrating 60 years open this year

Adrian Miller on the dearly departed Boney’s Smokehouse in Denver

“Order anything but brisket”; Arthur Bryant’s pleads customers to not order their most popular cut due to rising beef prices

Franklin Barbecue’s new sauce is Spicy

J.C. Reid on Roegels Barbecue in Katy

LOL

...but I gotta say, it reminds me of the infamous “Brooklyn BBQ” meme

Linkdown: 10/6/21

Featured

Recently, friend of the blog John Tanner (of John Tanner’s Barbecue Blog) ate his way across the piedmont of North Carolina while making stops on the NC Historic Barbecue Trail in honor of the late Jim Early. Early was the founder of the North Carolina Barbecue Society and driving force behind the NC Historic Barbecue Trail.

Notably, he makes a stop at our friends at Bar-B-Q King in Lincolnton where he delights in the “hollerin’ orders” system and has a great meal. Follow John’s journey below.

Native News

Ladies and gentlemen, it’s BBQ Bowl Week

Non-Native News

Has Texas Brisket Peaked?

Speaking of brisket, Tales from the Pits unveils their top 5 barbecue spots in Texas

The 38th Annual Collard & BBQ Festival was held this past weekend in Gaston, SC

Husk Barbeque in Greenville, SC closed earlier this week

What you can expect at Virgil’s Real Barbecue in Las Vegas

The legend of Joe Burney

Black Smoke cookout and book signing next Sunday in Denver

Southern Soul’s Firebox BBQ Festival was held this past weekend; notice anything about the photo?

Barbecue Bros Book Club: “Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue” by Adrian Miller

Not that we’re anywhere close to being qualified enough to evaluate books but more so as a public service announcement we will periodically discuss barbecue and barbecue-related books.

Monk: Of the barbecue books we’ve covered over the past few years, “Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue” by James Beard Award-winning author and self-proclaimed “Soul Food Scholar” Adrian Miller may just be the most important of them all. In Miller’s approachable writing style, he looks to correct the decades of whitewashing the Black (and even Native American) contribution to the revered American institution of barbecue in a very detailed and heavily researched fashion.

In the first half of his book, Miller corrects the historical narrative starting with Native Americans who laid the foundations of the process of smoking as well as the apparatus to perform it on. Whereas Native Americans were not widely enslaved, that is unfortunately where the Black contribution begins. Miller traces from the slave origins to the rise of the Black barbecue specialists who sometimes did the work without the credit of white barbecue men all the way to the modern black restaurant entrepreneurs like Henry Perry, the “Barbecue King” of Kansas City, Walter Jones of Jones Bar-B-Q Diner in Marianna, AR, and Jack Patillo of Beaumont, TX.

While the first half deals with the past, the second half explores the current climate as it relates to where African Americans sit in regards to restaurants, sauces, competitions and also looks ahead to the future of black barbecue. Rodney Scott, former Top Chef contestant Kenny Gilbert, and Ed and Ryan Mitchell are profiled in depth while Miller takes a pulse of barbecue recognition today through the efforts of other historians and writers such as Michael Twitty and Howard Conyers. Ultimately, he ends in a hopeful place.

Speaking of in-depth profiles, a minor complaint is that they oftentimes come mid-chapter (some times even mid-sentence) without warning or color coding. Once I became accustomed to how they were used, I found that I usually just skipped past and then came back after I finished the chapter. They are important and oftentimes covered newly discovered Black barbecue figures (such as Marie Jean of Arkansas or John “Doc” Hamilton of Seattle) but I wish they were utilized a little differently.

Bravo to Adrian Miller on writing a comprehensive history of the Black contribution to American barbecue. “Black Smoke” is a must read for not only those interested in barbecue history but also American history.

Linkdown: 5/19/21

Featured

This latest piece of controversial barbecue list content from one “chefspencil.com” has been rightly getting roasted online since the weekend, but perhaps that was the intent all along? I mean, who had even heard of “chefspencil.com,” an Austrialian website, before this list?

The list allegedly uses data from TripAdvisor and phew buddy TripAdvisor is not happy about any connection to th list and its backlash.

New Orlean’s at number 1? Red flag. No Texas cities on the list? Red flag. As for Charlotte’s rank of 3 on the list? I say this as a Charlotte resident, but red flag. I’m not the only Charlottean who feels this way. Enter Kathleen Purvis:

Let’s declare a moratorium on any further discussion or outrage on anything “chefspencil.com” related, particularly when it comes to barbecue.

Native News

Fighting words from the Hear to Say podcast host Tressie McMillan Cottom

An oldie but a goodie from Our State Magazine for National Barbecue Day this past Sunday

Non-Native News

Myron Mixon’s Jack’s Old South team wins Whole Hog and the whole shebang at last weekend’s Memphis in May Barbecue Championship

Three barbecue and brewery pairings in Texas

More coverage of Rodney Scott and Adrian Miller’s books, with quotes from Daniel Vaughn

Black Smoke vs Savory Spice Shop

High on the Hog premieres on Netflix in one week on 5/26