Friday Find: Rodney Scott and Lolis Elie on The Dave Chang Show

Monk: I don’t think a lot of secrets are actually spilled on this appearance by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Lolie on The Dave Chang show, other than you probably can’t cook Rodney Scott-level barbecue if you aren’t the man himself. The hour goes by quickly and its a great conversation nonetheless from guys who are clearly friends off microphone.

Description: Dave and Chris are joined by legendary pitmaster Rodney Scott and food historian Lolis Elie to discuss the wonderful world of whole-hog barbecue.

Friday Find: Aaron Franklin on the Dave Chang Show

In this conversation, Dave Chang focuses on how Franklin has become a shokunin, or master craftsman, for barbecue. In addition to the usual barbecue talk, Chang also asks Franklin a lot of questions about the hospitality that Franklin shows everyone that comes to Franklin Barbecue and how hard it was for him to step away from being in the restaurant almost 22 hours day.

In 2009, when Aaron Franklin and his wife, Stacy, opened up a barbecue trailer on the side of a highway in Austin, Texas, they had no idea it would snowball into one of the most popular barbecue restaurants in the nation. But Franklin Barbecue wouldn’t have become what it is without Aaron’s unwavering commitment to hard work and dedication. A decade removed from the Austin institution’s humble beginnings, Dave speaks with the world-class pitmaster from the Uber Eats House during SXSW about transfusing love and care into cooking, making an intentional effort to maintain work-life balance, and growing the restaurant through failure.

Friday Find: Lolis Eric Elie on The Dave Chang Show

Lolis Elie, a food writer and critic who wrote the barbecue road trip book Smokestack Lightning, joins David Chang on his podcast for a wide-ranging conversation on food and identity, only a short portion of which discusses barbecue. It’s a good conversation between Chang (who is really coming into his own as a podcaster) and the ever-thoughtful Elie.

People have subjective definitions when it comes to quality, and food is no exception. To compare one genre of food to another often requires nuance and context, making the whole endeavor that much more difficult. Dave speaks to writer and food critic Lolis Elie about how to evaluate food with care and respect.